Sherrie Flick

photo credit: Heather Mull

Sherrie Flick

Queen’s Ferry Press will publish Whiskey, Etc., a short story collection, in March 2016.

Sherrie published her debut novel Reconsidering Happiness with Bison Books, University of Nebraska Press as part of their Flyover Fiction series in 2009. It was a semi-finalist for the VCU First Novelist Award. Chuck Kinder called it “A big beautiful Buick of a book.” She is also author of the award-winning flash fiction chapbook I Call This Flirting (Flume, 2004). John McNally warned, “These are late-night stories, told after midnight, a femme fatale whispering sad and unraveled and lusty tales into your ear.”

Her stories are included in many anthologies, including: Winesburg, Indiana (Indiana University Press, Bloomington, 2015) eds. Michael Martone and Bryan Furuness; Flashed: Sudden Stories in Prose and Comics (Pressgang, Butler University, Indianapolis, 2015) eds. Sari Wilson and Josh Neufeld; Keeping the Wolves at Bay (Autumn House, 2010) ed. Sharon Dilworth; Sudden Fiction (Norton, 2007) eds. Robert Shapard and James Thomas; Flash Fiction Forward (Norton, 2006) eds. Robert Shapard and James Thomas; and You Have Time for This (Ooligan, 2007) ed. Tom Hazuka. Her essay “Flash in a Pan” appears in The Rose Metal Press Field Guide to Writing Flash Fiction, 2009, ed. Tara Masih.

These journals, quarterlies, and reviews have recently published her flash fiction: SmokeLong, The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, Wigleaf, The Laurel Review, Elm Leaves Journal, Passages North, Cortland Review, Corium, Prime Number, Ploughshares, and Booth. Over the years, her work has appeared in Prairie Schooner, North American Review, Quarterly West, Quarter After Eight, Puerto del Sol, Manoa, Northwest Review, Quick Fiction, and Black Warrior Review, among others.

She has received artist residencies from the The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow, Ucross Foundation, Atlantic Center for the Arts, and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, as well as a Tennessee Williams Scholarship from Sewanee Writers’ Conference. In 2006, she was honored as one of Pittsburgh’s “40 under 40.” She has also received an individual artist fellowship from Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, multiple PA Partners in the Arts grants, and an Artistic Vibrancy Award from The Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council as well as two City of Pittsburgh Proclamations for her work in the literary community.

She served as writer-in-residence at Salem College, Winston Salem, NC in January 2011. She now regularly teaches in Chatham University’s MFA and Food Studies programs.

Over the years, Sherrie has led interdisciplinary writing workshops in many arts institutions, including Carnegie Museum of Art and Silver Eye Center for Photography. She often helps curate literary programs in alternative settings, such as Wood-Fired Words with UnSmoke Art Space in Braddock, Pa. and as part of Jill Larson’s Mean Girls exhibition at Space Gallery in Pittsburgh.

She has been a regular contributor to Pittsburgh Quarterly magazine for which she received a Golden Quill Award from the Western Pennsylvania Press Club; she writes occasional food essays for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette and NEXTPittsburgh and has food essays in Ploughshares, Superstition Review and Fried Walleye and Cherry Pie: Midwestern Writers on Food.

For ten years, Sherrie served as artistic director and co-founder of the Gist Street Reading Series. For six years, she worked as Associate Curator of Education at the Frick Art & Historical Center. For five years, she was Assistant Editor of Western Pennsylvania History magazine at the Heinz History Center. She has also worked as a professional baker in both New Hampshire and California. Sherrie serves on the advisory boards for Braddock Avenue Books and Words Without Walls. She recently joined The Chautauqua Writers’ Festival staff as co-director with Phil Terman and Lori Jakiela, and she is fiction editor at Burnside Review.

A freelance writer and copy editor, she lives on the South Side Slopes of Pittsburgh with her husband, Rick Schweikert.